Nov. 13, 2001

American Cinematheque Presents...

An Evening With Producer Max Rosenberg

 

All guests are subject to their availability. All screenings are at the newly renovated Lloyd E. Rigler Theatre at the historic Egyptian (6712 Hollywood Boulevard between Highland and Las Palmas) in Hollywood.

Tickets available 30 days in advance.

Shows sold out in advance will be listed here.

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Tuesday, November 13 – 7:00 PM

A true American original, Max Rosenberg belongs to that breed of ultra-colorful producers including Samuel Z. Arkoff and Joseph E. Levine who combined surefire commercial instincts with an eye for discovering new talent. Rosenberg helped foster the early careers of Richard Lester, William Friedkin, Terence Stamp and others in movies like IT’S TRAD, DAD, THE BIRTHDAY PARTY and THE MIND OF MR. SOAMES – but he’s best known for co-founding Amicus (with partner Milton Subotsky), the gruesomely inventive horror studio that challenged Hammer Films for supremacy in the late 1960’s. Please join us for a special screening of two of Amicus’ finest horror anthology films, followed by a conversation with Max Rosenberg!

 

Rare I.B. Technicolor Print! TORTURE GARDEN, 1967, Columbia, 93 min. Dir. Freddie Francis. Written by PSYCHO author Robert Bloch, this very entertaining witches’ brew stars Burgess Meredith as carnival showman Dr. Diablo, who has the power to let his audience – including Jack Palance, Peter Cushing and Beverly Adams – glimpse into their near futures with terrifying results.

 

Rare I.B. Technicolor Print! DR. TERROR’S HOUSE OF HORRORS, 1965, 98 min. Dir. Freddie Francis. This was the first in Amicus’s long-lived series of horror anthologies and is certainly among the best, with Peter Cushing starring as the mysterious doctor who tells five men’s bizarre fortunes on a nocturnal train trip. The stellar cast also includes Christopher Lee, Michael Gough and a very young Donald Sutherland. Discussion between films with producer Max Rosenberg.