American Cinematheque at the Egyptian Theatre Presents...
Making Movie History for 80 Years!

Click to print Page 1 or Page 2 or Full Text of an May 2008 Calendar!
Tickets available 30 days in advance. Tickets are $8 general admission unless noted otherwise.
Sold out programs will be indicated here if sold out 24 hours in advance of screening date.
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The American Cinematheque is a non-profit 501 (C) (3) organization.
The Film Programs of the American Cinematheque are presented at the magnificently renovated, historic 1922 Grauman's Hollywood Egyptian Theatre. Located at 6712 Hollywood Boulevard.
Photo Credit: Randall Michelson. Detail of Egyptian Theatre Ceiling.

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Robert Nudelman Champion of Hollywood

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Champion of Hollywood Preservation Remembered

The American Cinematheque owes much to the support of Robert Nudelman and his efforts to maintain Hollywood Boulevard's legendary movie palaces among other important historic buildings in a not-so-long-ago deteriorating tinsel town. Robert loved the movies and he loved the Egyptian. We always knew we were showing something worth seeing on the big screen when Robert made time to attend - given that he had probably seen all the classics a million times already. The staff will miss him sauntering up to us with a wry comment or an interesting story relevant to that evening's show. He is an irreplaceable force in historic preservation and a tireless champion of keeping the legend of Hollywood alive.

-- Margot Gerber

Posted May 7, 2008

Robert Wood Nudelman, 52, a legendary figure in the fight to preserve Hollywood’s heritage, passed away at his father’s home in Tuscon Tuesday. Ever present at meetings and hearings in the Hollywood community for 30 years, Nudelman is often credited as a driving force behind the restoration of landmark theaters and other buildings in Hollywood, spearheading a renaissance of the once-blighted area.

The loss of such a pivotal community leader has been met with unspeakable shock and sadness. He was the longtime Director of Preservation Issues for Hollywood Heritage, and was a past president of the organization and curator of its Hollywood Heritage Museum. He was an officer of Cinecon and president of the Project Area Committee for the Hollywood Redevelopment Area. He was the author of many books on Hollywood’s history, including "Historic Hollywood: An Illustrated History" and "Early Hollywood". At the time of his death, he was working with Debbie and Todd Reynolds’ on the Hollywood Motion Picture Museum in Tennessee.

Nudelman was the son of Ruth Donovan Wood and Dr. Sol Nudelman, a leader in medical imaging. He grew up in Illinois and Rhode Island before a stint in Germany and then Tuscon. He studied Theater Arts at the University of Arizona. His brother Mark and mother preceded him in death.

Nudelman launched his activism with the fight to save Lot 2 at the MGM Studios, and soon with the Wiltern Theater. He figured prominently in the campaigns to change minds and plans for such important landmarks as the El Capitan Theater and the Cinerama Dome. He provided historical photographs, data, and restoration details to countless property owners of such landmarks as Grauman’s Chinese Theater and the Pantages Theater, making his name synonymous with Hollywood and film history. There probably isn’t a single historic building or development project in Hollywood that Mr. Nudelman didn’t have a part in, sharing his encyclopedic knowledge, agitating for better and more consistent planning, and defending Hollywood’s heritage.

Nudelman made friends of enemies, keeping up a constant dialogue with politicians, property owners, and neighborhood activists, who learned to treasure his storehouse of knowledge, his intelligence, and his uncanny ability to be right. He was tireless in his contributions to the Hollywood community.

Read more memories of Robert.

Information about a memorial for Robert will be posted on the Hollywood Heritage website.