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American Cinematheque at the Aero Theatre Presents...
Movies on the Big Screen Since 1940!
1328 Montana Avenue at 14th Street in Santa Monica


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Click to print Page 1 or Page 2 or Full Text of a July 2009 Calendar!
Series compiled by: Gwen Deglise and Grant Moninger.

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SOLD OUT SCREENINGS: There will be a waiting line for Sold Out screenings. Tickets often become available at the door the night of an event.

Sold out programs will be indicated here if sold out 24 hours in advance of screening date.

All guests are subject to availability. The Cinematheque will offer a refund due to guest cancellations only IF the refund transaction is complete PRIOR to the start of the show.

 

 

Tickets are $9 general admission unless noted otherwise.
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The American Cinematheque is a non-profit 501 (C) (3) organization.
The Film Programs of the American Cinematheque are presented at the newly re-opened and renovated Aero Theatre at 1328 Montana Avenue in Santa Monica and at the magnificently renovated, historic 1922 Grauman's Hollywood Egyptian Theatre. Located at 6712 Hollywood Boulevard.
Photo Credit: Barry Gerber. Aero Theatre (c) 2004.

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<<< July 17 - 24, 2009 >>>

Can't Stop the Musicals

 

http://www.myspace.com/americancinematheque

 

More Musical Classics in our Robert Wise Series: WEST SIDE STORY, THE SOUND OF MUSIC, STAR! this month at the Aero!

 

Few genres demand the big screen treatment like the musical, and this month the Cinematheque gives you the opportunity to see some of the greatest song-and-dance films ever made the way they were meant to be seen. From a pair of hippie takes on the Bible (JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR and GODSPELL) to Robert Wise classics and the 1980s favorites FOOTLOOSE and GREASE, this series is a feast for the eyes and ears.

 

Friday, July 17 – 7:30 PM

JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR, 1973, Universal, 108 min. Dir. Norman Jewison. An endlessly entertaining, strange hybrid extravaganza, as Hollywood and Flower Power sentiments collide courtesy of the Broadway smash hit, revisiting the public life of Christ and his crucifixion. Adapted from Tim Rice and Andrew Lloyd Webber’s landmark rock-opera, and featuring such standout numbers as "I Don’t Know How to Love Him," "What’s the Buzz?" and "Heaven on Their Minds," performed by an extremely talented cast including Ted Neeley as Christ, Yvonne Elliman as Mary Magdalene and the late Carl Anderson in a standout role as Judas Iscariot. Trailer

GODSPELL: A MUSICAL BASED ON THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO ST. MATTHEW, 1973, Sony Repertory, 103 min. The story of Jesus is transposed to the 1970s, where a group of young hippie disciples sing and dance their way through New York City. Director David Greene infuses his adaptation of the popular stage musical with energy and joy, helped along by Stephen Schwartz's catchy score (including highlights like "Day by Day").

 

 

Sunday, July 19 – 7:30 PM

DAMES, 1934, Warner Bros., 91 min. Dirs. Ray Enright & Busby Berkeley. Joan Blondell, Dick Powell and Ruby Keeler star in this Busby Berkeley extravaganza, which features terrific songs like "When You Were a Smile on Your Mother's Lips and a Twinkle in Your Daddy's Eye" and the classic title track. Best of all is "I Only Have Eyes for You," a hallucinatory musical number in which Powell imagines that all of the women in New York have been transformed into Ruby Keeler--one of the best examples ever of choreographer Berkeley's obsession with multiples and symmetry. Trailer

GOLD DIGGERS OF 1935, 1935, Warner Bros., 95 min. Dir. Busby Berkeley. Following the success of GOLD DIGGERS OF 1933, Warners and director/choreographer/mad genius Busby Berkeley returned for this even more fabulous concoction starring Dick Powell, Adolphe Menjou and Gloria Stuart, featuring some of the most jaw-droppingly lavish musical numbers ever conceived. Mrs. Prentiss (Alice Brady) has her heart set on her daughter (Stuart) falling for a millionaire snuffbox expert (Hugh Herbert), but she has eyes for a desk clerk (Powell) studying to be a doctor. If you’re a fan of Baz Luhrmann’s MOULIN ROUGE, then don’t miss this surreal masterpiece of over-the-top choreography and art direction! 1936 Academy Award nominee for Best Original Song – "Lullaby of Broadway." Trailer

 

 

Friday, July 24 – 7:30 PM

GREASE, 1978, Paramount, 110 min. "Grease is the word!" Pompadoured tough-guy John Travolta learns the meaning of true love, 1950’s style, from summertime sweetheart Olivia Newton-John who turns up unexpectedly at Rydell High as the new girl in school when the Fall semester starts! The fantastic supporting cast includes Stockard Channing, Jeff Conaway, Eve Arden and Frankie Avalon. A soundtrack of wall-to-wall hits ("You’re The One That I Want," "Hopelessly Devoted to You," "Look at Me, I’m Sandra Dee," Greased Lightning") and plenty of dancing make director Randal Kleiser’s GREASE an irresistible teen-dream of a movie musical. Trailer

Archival Print! FOOTLOOSE, 1984, Paramount, 107 min. Dir. Herbert Ross. Hip city boy Ren (Kevin Bacon in his breakthrough performance) gets a heavy dose of culture shock when he moves to a Midwestern town where dancing has been outlawed. Ren immediately clashes with the local preacher (John Lithgow), and his mission to bring rock and roll to the area gets more complicated when he falls for the preacher's daughter (Lori Singer). Family melodrama mixes with infectious musical numbers (including the title song by Kenny Loggins and "Let's Hear It For the Boy") to create an 1980s classic. Trailer