American Cinematheque at the Egyptian Theatre Presents...
Making Movie History for Over 80 Years!


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Series programmed by:Chris D., Gwen Deglise and Grant Moninger.
Special Thanks to: Emily Horn & Barry Allen/PARAMOUNT; Caitlin Robertson/20TH CENTURY FOX; Marilee Womack/WARNER BROS.; Jared Sapolin & Helena Brissenden/SONY REPERTORY; MAGNOLIA PICTURES.

 

 

SOLD OUT SCREENINGS: There will be a waiting line for Sold Out screenings. Tickets often become available at the door the night of an event.

Sold out programs will be indicated here if sold out 24 hours in advance of screening date.

 

 

All guests are subject to availability. The Cinematheque will offer a refund due to guest cancellations only IF the refund transaction is complete PRIOR to the start of the show.

Tickets available 30 days in advance. Tickets are $10 general admission unless noted otherwise.
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The American Cinematheque is a non-profit 501 (C) (3) organization.
The Film Programs of the American Cinematheque are presented at the magnificently renovated, historic 1922 Grauman's Hollywood Egyptian Theatre. Located at 6712 Hollywood Boulevard.
Photo Credit: Randall Michelson. Detail of Egyptian Theatre Ceiling. Aero Theatre: Barry King.

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<<< February 12 - 18, 2009 >>>

Valentine Films for Lovers

 

Some Films in this series will play at the Aero Theatre!

 

Join us for films that incorporate the euphoria and exhilaration (as well as the occasionally painful consequences) of being in love, including two versions of a Shakespeare classic – Franco Zeffirelli’s ROMEO AND JULIET and Baz Luhrmann’s ROMEO + JULIET. We’ll also be screening Luhrmann’s MOULIN ROUGE and a Bette Davis double feature (NOW, VOYAGER and JEZEBEL). And at the Aero, FROM HERE TO ETERNITY, CASABLANCA, BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY’S, ROMAN HOLIDAY, a Sneak Preview of TWO LOVERS (with Joaquin Phoenix and Gwyneth Paltrow) and more!

 

 

Friday, February 13 – 7:30 PM

ROMEO AND JULIET, 1968, Paramount, 138 min. A protégé of director Luchino Visconti, Franco Zeffirelli had already directed another Shakespeare adaptation (THE TAMING OF THE SHREW with Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor) a year earlier, and once again brought his obsessive devotion to costume, set design and period detail to what many regard as his best movie. For the first time on film, the Bard’s star-crossed lovers are actually played by teenagers (the age range Shakespeare intended). Leonard Whiting and Olivia Hussey are perfect, offering an innocence and youthful vitality that invigorates the proceedings to genuine emotional heights. They are complimented by an excellent supporting cast, including Michael York, John McEnery and Milo O’Shea. Nominated for Best Picture and Best Director, the film won Oscars for Best Cinematography (Pasqualino De Santis) and Best Costume Design (Danilo Donati), but shamefully did not receive a nomination for its sublime Nino Rota score and theme song, "A Time to Love." "They didn't merely look their parts, they embodied them in the freshness of their personalities, and although neither was a trained actor, they were fully equal to Shakespeare's dialogue for them." – Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times; "…a lovely, sensitive, friendly popularization of the play -- the lovers, Leonard Whiting and Olivia Hussey, as young and full of life as they ought to be…" – Renata Adler, The New York Times More | Trailer

 

 

Saturday, February 14 – 7:30 PM

Double Feature:

MOULIN ROUGE, 2001, 20th Century Fox, 127 min. Director Baz Luhrmann’s phantasmagorical musical has been hailed as one of the most visually inventive and wildly kinetic films in recent memory for its mixture of turn-of-the-century Parisian nightlife, late-20th-century pop music (beautifully performed in the film by lovers Nicole Kidman and Ewan McGregor) and astonishingly ornate production and costume design, courtesy of Catherine Martin. Trailer | Review

ROMEO + JULIET 1996, 20th Century Fox, 120 min. Writer-director-producer Baz Luhrmann re-envisions the bard’s star-crossed lovers as Gen X gangsters, played by Leonardo DiCaprio and Claire Danes. The film’s retro-futuristic look, with guns standing in for swords and Veracruz for the mythical Verona Beach, earned an Oscar nomination for production designers Catherine Martin and Brigitte Boch. Co-written by Craig Pearce, co-starring John Leguizamo, Paul Sorvino and Brian Dennehy, with original music by Radiohead and others. Trailer | Official Site

 

 

 

Sunday, February 15 – 7:30 PM

Bette Davis Double Feature:

NOW, VOYAGER, 1942, Warner Bros., 117 min. Dir. Irving Rapper. "Don't ask for the moon -- we have the stars." In this classic Bette Davis soap opera, the great actress plays a repressed spinster who finds love with Paul Henreid after psychiatrist Claude Rains encourages her to stand up to her domineering mother and to embrace life. Max Steiner's Oscar-winning score provides just the right amount of operatic emphasis in this manipulative but undeniably effective, intelligent Hollywood sudser. "…a highly narcotic, swoon-inducing romance in the Bette Davis canon."—Jeremiah Kipp, Slant Magazine More

JEZEBEL, 1938, Warner Bros., 103 min. Bette Davis won an Oscar for her performance as a tempestuous Southern belle torn between her prime suitor (George Brent) and the man she truly loves (Henry Fonda). In addition to the top-notch performances, director William Wyler provides some gorgeous set-pieces, from the fancy ball to which Davis wears her scandalous red dress to an eerie New Orleans plagued by a yellow fever epidemic. More | Trailers